WATCH: Under the Grenados flag, protesters storm the streets in a third day of violence

Women in Patois football gear pound their fists in the air in downtown Guadeloupe where security forces have clashed with protesters for a third consecutive day. Both sides claim to be peaceful, but security…

WATCH: Under the Grenados flag, protesters storm the streets in a third day of violence

Women in Patois football gear pound their fists in the air in downtown Guadeloupe where security forces have clashed with protesters for a third consecutive day. Both sides claim to be peaceful, but security forces have reportedly used tear gas and batons, and reports on social media suggest that the protesters are hurling stones and burning tires.

Grenados, who are demonstratively holding up a banner which says “6 feet, 30 centimeters, 4 years,” celebrate the bench which represents their region in the scrum, supported by a members of the army, as they march through the streets of Grand Anse on January 21, 2019. (Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images)

Grenada and Guadeloupe are a three-and-a-half hour flight apart, but that hasn’t stopped their protesters lashing out at each other with equal ferocity. What began as a peaceful march of approximately 300 people, carrying signs reading “no war on a nation” and “We want a restoration of law and order,” Sunday into Monday, ended with security forces moving in with tear gas, a wall, and helicopters.

A 7-year-old boy holds a sign with a poignant sign about the social conflicts that have intensified on the island over the past month. An umbrella on a nearby street (Karin Van Etten / National Post)

Grenados, who are demonstratively holding up a banner which says “6 feet, 30 centimeters, 4 years,” celebrate the bench which represents their region in the scrum, supported by a members of the army, as they march through the streets of Grand Anse on January 21, 2019. (Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images)

As the long, slow walk back to their cars, many protesters have been lifted above on inflatable mattresses, as if on the gym floor, staring at the rest of the island, and below of them being photographed by the crowds. Others at the front of the main march held a black flag with a woman’s face on it, drawing an obvious parallel with these protests. Many Grenadians have tried to call for peace, but in recent days they’ve been met with booing from the crowd.

Astrid Armouda is an editor-at-large for the National Post in Canada. Follow her on Twitter @AstridArmouda.

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